Dear Angelina – Did you know you can lower your cancer risk, bite by bite?

Wow, the world is rocked once again with the voluntary removal of both of Angelina Jolie’s breasts. While mainstream pundits applaud and gush over the decision as an informed, wise and courageous choice to make, alternative voices scream that this type of glorification of self-mutilation is ignorant at best, even immoral, perhaps.  As the debate rages on, why don’t we take a moment to realize that Ms. Jolie is a grown woman who is entitled to make decisions about her own body (as all women should be) whether the rest of the watching world agrees with them or not.

The point is this: it would behoove Ms. Jolie to understand a lot more about how to prevent cancer in herself, and then use her celebrity status to share the message of true prevention with the rest of the world.  After all, if you have a faulty repair gene, you are still at risk for cancer, breasts or no breasts.

What you do from this point forward will have more effect on your own future health, Angelina, than any operation any ever could.

Ms. Jolie, if you are reading this, may I suggest you become familiar with the emerging field of science known as epigenetics. Epigenetics teaches us that factors “beyond the control of the gene, known as epigenetic factors, and largely determined by a combination of nutrition, psychospiritual states that feed back into our physiology, lifestyle factors, and environmental exposures, constitute as high as 95% of what determines any disease risk”, according to health writer and editor Sayer Ji.

Food and its myriad of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals have the power to communicate with our genes in a powerful and awe-inspiring way.  If you find that hard to swallow, check out the work of Dr. Bruce Lipton and others at the forefront of this fascinating new field.

Oh, and while you’re at it, consider adding this vital book to your cancer prevention resource library, THE WHOLE-FOOD GUIDE FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS.  The book starts with epigenetics then moves quickly into exactly which foods and nutrients signal our genes to express themselves, or to remain quiet.  And you’ll find lots of practical suggestions for incorporating these wonderful gene-altering foods such as basil, pomegranate and broccoli, into your life. Do your whole family a favor and check it out!

With love and best wishes to you, Brad and the gang,

Helayne Waldman, co-author, THE WHOLE FOOD GUIDE FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS

      www.wholefoodguideforbreastcancer.com

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